Essential Medicine and Drugs Manufacturing

An industrial plant at Aris near Windhoek, the capital city of Namibia
Photo by Grobler du Preez / Shutterstock
Essential Medicine and Drugs Manufacturing
SectorMost major industry classification systems use sources of revenue as their basis for classifying companies into specific sectors, subsectors and industries. In order to group like companies based on their sustainability-related risks and opportunities, SASB created the Sustainable Industry Classification System® (SICS®) and the classification of sectors, subsectors and industries in the SDG Investor Platform is based on SICS.
Health Care
Biotechnology and Pharmaceuticals
Business Model Description

Establish and operate manufacturing facilities producing essential medicine and drugs with a specific focus on intravenous fluids products.

Expected Impact

Produce affordable pharmaceuticals, especially intravenous fluids products, to meet local market needs and offer medication at affordable prices.

Indicative ReturnDescribes the rate of growth an investment is expected to generate within the IOA. The indicative return is identified for the IOA by establishing its Internal Rate of Return (IRR), Return of Investment (ROI) or Gross Profit Margin (GPM).
20% - 25% (in IRR)
Investment TimeframeDescribes the time period in which the IOA will pay-back the invested resources. The estimate is based on asset expected lifetime as the IOA will start generating accumulated positive cash-flows.
Long Term (10+ years)
Market SizeDescribes the value of potential addressable market of the IOA. The market size is identified for the IOA by establishing the value in USD, identifying the Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) or providing a numeric unit critical to the IOA.
USD 100 million - USD 1 billion
Direct ImpactDescribes the primary SDG(s) the IOA addresses.
Good health and well-being (SDG 3)
Indirect ImpactDescribes the secondary SDG(s) the IOA addresses.
Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (SDG 9) Decent Work and Economic Growth (SDG 8)
Sector Sources
  • I) SDG Center for Africa and Sustainable Development Solutions Network, 2019, Africa SDG Index and Dashboards Report 2019, Kigali and New York: SDG Center for Africa and Sustainable Development Solutions Network, https://sdgcafrica.org. II) Republic of Namibia, National Planning Commission, 2017, Namibia's 5th National Development Plan (NDP5), https://www.npc.gov.na/?wpfb_dl=294. III) Harambee Prosperity Plan II, 2021-2025, 2021, Republic of Namibia, https://www.met.gov.na/files/downloads/f0b_Harambee%20Prosperity%20Plan%20II.pdf. IV) Namibia - Health Sector Public Expenditure Review, 2019, Washington, D.C, World Bank Group, https://elibrary.worldbank.org/doi/pdf/10.1596/32111. V) Republic of Namibia, National Planning Commission, 2018, Implementation of Sustainable Development Goals, Voluntary National Review, https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/19880New_Version_Full_Voluntary_National_Review_2018_single_1_Report.pdf. VI) DNA Economics, 2021, SAM Multiplier Analysis for the SDG study in Namibia, Six Capitals.
IOA Sources
  • 1) EOS Capital Website, About NIDIF, https://www.eoscapital.com.na/nidif. 2) Doré Pharmaceuticals, 2017, Doré Pharmaceuticals Prospectus, https://www.unido.org/sites/default/files/files/2018-03/Dore%20Pharmaceuticals%20Pty%20Ltd.%2C%20Namibia_Company%20Presentation_01032018%20Bonn.pdf. 3) Namibian Industrial Development Agency (NIDA)., 2021, Potential Bankable projects, available upon request from NIDA. 4) PWC, 2021, Republic of Namibia Corporate - Tax credits and incentives, https://taxsummaries.pwc.com/republic-of-namibia/corporate/tax-credits-and-incentives. 5) World Bank, 2019, Namibia Public Expenditure Review Health Sector Public Expenditure Review, https://documents1.worldbank.org/curated/en/268141563376806867/pdf/Namibia-Health-Sector-Public-Expenditure-Review.pdf. 6) Monasa / UNDP interview with EOS Capital, conducted on 14 December 2020. 7) National Planning Commission (NPC), 2021, Harambee Prosperity Plan 2, available upon request from NPC. 8) Ministry of Health and Social Services, 2011, National Guidelines for Medicines Safety Surveillance, https://www.who-umc.org/media/1088/namibia.pdf. 9) Study on behalf of Windhoek Pharmaceuticals by Dr. Loneson Mondo (MBA, DBA), 2011, Available on request from Loneson Mondo (lonesonmondo@gmail.com). 10) Medicines and Related Substances Control Act, 2003, Republic of Namibia, https://laws.parliament.na/annotated-laws-regulations/law-regulation.php?id=146. 11) Namibia Medicines Regulatory Council (NMRC), Ministry of Health & Social Services, https://nmrc.gov.na. 12) Therapeutics Information and Pharmacovigilance Center (TIPC), Ministry of Health & Social Services, https://nmrc.gov.na/tipc1. 13) Namibia Investment Promotion and Development Board (NIPDB), 2021, https://nipdb.com. 14) Bio Solve (Pty) Ltd, 2021, Manufacturing of Intravenous Fluids in Namibia Business plan, Available upon request from the Namibia Industrial Development agency (NIDA). 15) World Bank, 2019, Namibia Public Expenditure Review: Health Sector Public Expenditure Review, https://documents1.worldbank.org/curated/en/268141563376806867/pdf/Namibia-Health-Sector-Public-Expenditure-Review.pdf. 16) Namibia Industrial Development Agency (NIDA), 2020, NIDA’s Project Profiles, Available upon request from NIDA. 17) PEPFAR, 2020. Namibia Country Operational Plan (COP) 2020: Strategic Direction Summary. US State Department, https://www.state.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/COP-2020-Namibia-SDS-FINAL.pdf.